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← All posts tagged космос

@lurker:

Realizing I got more work to do to understand the space better so I know exactly what I'm looking for.

@lurker:

На завтрак я сегодня хавал темную энергию укутавшись в незримую материю вселенной и запивая молоком гравитационных волн разлитых звездами которых давно нет я перевариваю боль вселенной я здесь живу веками во тьме построенных из сгустков атомов рожденных смертью света и сотканных в агонии случайных встреч #2848117

@lurker:

дороговато, но...

@lurker:

маск обосрался с драконом, скажут они teslarati.com

@lurker:

чм-то напоминает goatse missionjuno.swri.edu

@lurker:

Radiation from an early Earth that glowed like a star would have vaporized metal to form air layerвокруг Луны sciencenews.org

@lurker:

As the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft approached its destination on July 4, 1997, no NASA mission had successfully reached the Red Planet in more than 20 years.

In the 20 years since Pathfinder's touchdown, eight other NASA landers and orbiters have arrived successfully, and not a day has passed without the United States having at least one active robot on Mars or in orbit around Mars.

@lurker:

Бог создал Юпитер, чтобы защитить Землю twitter.com

@lurker:

тут cfa.harvard.edu пишут у солнышка был брат

@lurker:

apod.nasa.gov интересно, а где же всякие smbh?

@lurker:

я как-то пропустил, что китайцы сели на луну physics-astronomy.com

@lurker:

я совсем пропустил как димон гонял на мкс youtube.com ну а чо — может себе позволить XD

@lurker:

один из немногих русских фильмов в последнее время, которые не стыдно смотреть #2871644 ну, опять же, потому что педалят тему подвигов советов

@lurker:

The cosmic swirl and slosh of giant waves in an enormous reservoir of glowing hot gas are traced in this enhanced X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory. The frame spans over 1 million light-years across the center of the nearby Perseus Galaxy Cluster, some 240 million light-years distant. Like other clusters of galaxies, most of the observable mass in the Perseus cluster is in the form of the cluster-filling gas. With temperatures in the tens of millions of degrees, the gas glows brightly in X-rays.

@lurker:

ого, я тут срыв покровов такой пропустил youtube.com вот что значит не смотреть зомбоящик

@lurker:

чё там у москалей meduza.io сразу вспомнил youtube.com

@lurker:

In ZT’s novella, the AI has developed its own religious iconography and it worships an original “Urge” it calls Demis. The Dark counterpart to Demis is a destructive force called Elon, which the AI believes has settled on Mars and is plotting the overthrow of Demis’s creation... No one present at the reading missed the obvious references to Demis Hassabis and Elon Musk. They are at diametrically opposite poles in the debate over artificial intelligence. In a conversation between the two men in 2014, Elon told Demis that the reason that his SpaceX program was so important was that Mars colonization would be a bolt-hole escape if AI turns on humanity. Demis replied: “AI will simply follow humans to Mars.”
newsweek.com

а Элон Маск, как оказалось, знатный параноик

@lurker:

продолжаем отмечать день космонавта

@lurker:

количество найденых ключевых слов: 2
Cooper flew as Command Pilot of Gemini 5 on an eight-day, 120-orbit mission with Pete Conrad. The two astronauts established a new space endurance record by traveling a distance of 3,312,993 miles (5,331,745 km) in 190 hours and 56 minutes, showing that astronauts could survive in space for the length of time necessary to go from the Earth to the Moon and back.

@lurker:

Like all Mercury flights, Faith 7 was designed for fully automatic control, a controversial engineering decision which in many ways reduced the role of an astronaut to that of a passenger, and prompted Chuck Yeager to describe Mercury astronauts as "Spam in a can".[4] Toward the end of the Faith 7 flight there were mission-threatening technical problems. During the 19th orbit, the capsule had a power failure. Carbon dioxide levels began rising, and the cabin temperature jumped to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38°C). Cooper turned to his understanding of star patterns, took manual control of the tiny capsule and successfully estimated the correct pitch for re-entry into the atmosphere. Some precision was needed in the calculation, since if the capsule came in too steep, g-forces would be too large, and if its trajectory were too shallow, it would shoot out of the atmosphere again, back into space. Cooper drew lines on the capsule window to help him check his orientation before firing the re-entry rockets. "So I used my wrist watch for time," he later recalled, "my eyeballs out the window for attitude. Then I fired my retrorockets at the right time and landed right by the carrier."[5][6]